IT Maturity in K-12 Districts - Front PageIn our last post, we discussed how self-service is a key area of focus for resource optimization and improving IT maturity. In this post, we’re going to focus on another key area—Knowledge-Centered Support (KCS).

KCS leverages participation from an engaged user community (i.e., crowdsourcing) to expand both the breadth and depth of information available. While KCS was initially developed for use in customer support environments, it can work equally well across other organizational areas.

47% of participants in our 2018 K-12 Pulse Study rank their ability to share knowledge through a centralized repository as poor. By leveraging KCS, new content is created as a byproduct of group problem solving where popular content is reviewed and expanded based on collective experience and knowledge.

And here’s a fun fact—a recent study shows the benefits of KCS can include a 30-50% increase in first contact resolution AND a 50% decrease in incoming load thanks to online self-service, which also shows how the two go hand in hand.

Knowledge Centered Support (KCS) and first contact resolution KCS is based on four main principles:

1. New content is created as a byproduct of problem solving.
2. Popular content is reviewed and expanded.
3. Up-to-date collective experience is collected in a knowledge base.
4. Learning, cooperation, and knowledge sharing are incentivized.

As you can see, KCS creates a symbiotic relationship between district IT departments and the user communities they serve. Not only does it help optimize resources (in conjunction with an online self-service portal), it goes a long way to improving the overall customer experience.

Check back soon for future blogs that highlight the other areas K-12 districts should focus on to improve their IT maturity.

The TDX 2018 K-12 Pulse Study is now available and you can get your copy here!

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